Master essential Mac skills!

Expand or refresh your Mac know-how with
Take Control of Mac Basics by Tonya Engst!

Take Control of Safari 4
Price
$10.00
Pages
92
Formats
PDF EPUB Mobi
Version
1.0
Published
Jun 17, 2009

Take Control of Safari 4

Make the most of Apple’s Safari, a Mac Web browser with many hidden and under-appreciated talents!

Go beyond basic Web browsing in Safari 4 with this definitive guide from long-time Mac expert Sharon Zardetto! You’ll find detailed coverage of new Safari 4 features like Top Sites and searching the page content of your bookmarks and history, along with essential advice on smart ways to keep track of where you’ve been, load multiple Web pages at once, search both the Web and the content of pages you’re reading, fill out forms automatically, keep track of passwords, download files, use RSS to keep up with your favorite Web sites, and manage your Web-browsing history.

Safari 5? If you are running Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, this “Safari 4” ebook is the right one for you. Safari 5 runs on 10.5 Leopard and 10.6 Snow Leopard, and you can read all about it in Take Control of Safari 5. Or, if you are running 10.7 Lion or 10.8 Mountain Lion, the ebook you want is Take Control of Safari 6.

More Info

Read this book to learn answers to questions like these:

  • How do I load six Web pages at once?
  • Now that I’ve loaded six pages, how do I best work with them?
  • What are all the keyboard shortcuts for working with tabs?
  • How do I bookmark a page I want to return to?
  • How do I import Firefox bookmarks?
  • I have 1,042 bookmarks. Is there a sensible way to search or organize them?
  • What are the default keyboard shortcuts for the bookmarks bar?
  • Can I search for text on the currently active Web page?
  • How do I erase my history to prevent someone snooping through it?
  • Where does Safari store Web site user names and passwords?
  • Help! However Safari stored my password, it doesn’t work any more!
  • How do I use Safari to read RSS headlines from different sites?
  • How do I “snip” a Web page to make it into a Dashboard widget?

Safari 3? Though this book focuses on Safari 4, much of it applies to Safari 3 too.

What's New

What's New in Safari 4

Many of Safari 4’s new features are background improvements—such as increased page-loading speed and support for the CSS Effects standard—that can enhance your browsing experience but don’t require any action (or learning) on your part.

From a user’s point of view, Safari 4 is so similar to its predecessor that you can transition to it with neither fuss nor muss. Yet it does offer new features that, if not revolutionary, are evolutionary in Safari’s development.

The new features:

  • The flashiest new feature, Top Sites—which turns out to be some steak as well as sizzle—is covered in Manage Your Top Sites . On the opposite end of the flash spectrum is the extremely useful new full-page zoom described in Supersize Me .
  • “Smart…field” is a Safari 4 buzz phrase. Use the Address Field covers the smart address field, while Use the Google Search Field describes the smart search field and The Search Snapback .
  • “Full…search” is another buzz phrase. The Finder’s iTunes-inspired Cover Flow view has spread to Safari for reviewing your bookmarks and history (Figure 12, p. 36; Figure 18, p. 53). Both can now be searched not just by URLs or page titles, but also by the page content. Search Your History and Bookmarks covers this incredibly convenient improvement.
  • Safari 4’s tab bar has a few subtle changes, covered in Take the Tab Tour .
FAQ

Is this ebook helpful if I’m still using Safari 3?

Although it focuses on Safari 4, well over 80 percent of its information applies to Safari 3, too.

Does this ebook cover the Windows version of Safari?

Although we think that a lot of the info in this ebook will apply to the Windows version of Safari, we’ve not tested it under Windows, and some of the content is Mac specific. If you were hoping for Windows coverage, please write in and let us know so that we can consider bringing Windows into the picture for a future version.

What are the system and hardware requirements for running Safari 4?

In addition to Mac OS X 10.4.11 Tiger or Mac OS X 10.5.7 Leopard, Safari 4 requires:

  • Processor: Apple’s requirements state: Mac with an Intel processor or a PowerPC G5, G4, or G3 processor and built-in FireWire. This led to a spate of “But the 13-inch MacBook doesn’t have FireWire! How can a browser ‘need’ FireWire?” wails, but that’s due to a misreading (or Apple’s miswriting) of the text. Any Intel-based Mac is fine; the FireWire component modifies the list of PowerPC models. FireWire itself is not the issue; the phrase “built-in FireWire” is simply the way Apple describes its later G3 desktop and laptop models. Any G4 or G5 model will run Safari 4, and only the early non-FireWire G3 models cannot.

  • Memory: The minimum RAM requirement is 256 MB. These days, you can hardly work with less than a gigabyte of RAM (four times the 256 MB minimum), so the vast majority of users can meet this requirement; those who can’t will find that memory upgrades are exceedingly cheap. Find out how much memory your Mac has by choosing About This Mac from the Apple menu.

  • Video capability: If you’re using Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, you won’t be able to use Top Sites or Cover Flow views unless you have the proper video card. Check here for more information on compatible video cards, how to check which one you have, and how to, in some cases, update the video-card driver. (This link describes the beta release of Safari 4. If it doesn’t work, go to the Safari 4 download page and click the More Details link under the Macintosh Requirements list.)

The above entry was last updated on June 18, 2009

Reader Comments

From AUSOM News, published by The Apple Users’ Society of Melbourne

My entire mess was due to the fact that I had not bothered to learn how to open new tabs where I wanted them, how to move tabs between windows, and how to move between tabs. Even my bookmarks were a mess… Sharon has obviously put a great deal of time into making the best use of Safari’s tab and/or window features. The description of the various options is clear and often in a table form, so different approaches are obvious at a glance. All I had to do was read a few pages of the book and I had a positive feeling that at last I understood this concept. —Pam

Update Plans

We do not plan to update this ebook with additional content about Safari 4. New editions about Safari 5 and Safari 6, however, are available.

Posted by Tonya Engst

Blog
  1. MobileMe Going Away, Fate of MobileMe Syncing of Safari Bookmarks Unknown

    On June 6, 2011, Apple announced a new service called iCloud that will appear at some point later in 2011 (“fall” in the northern hemisphere), and will replace MobileMe from Apple’s perspective. Until then, MobileMe continues unchanged, except that Apple is no longer selling subscriptions or charging for renewals; all current members automatically have their accounts extended through the end of June 2012.

    When iCloud becomes available, existing MobileMe members will be able to migrate to the new service, which will be free (albeit with optional paid features, such as iTunes Match and additional storage). So far, Apple hasn’t released any details about the fate of Mac-to-Mac syncing of things like bookmarks and keychains.

    In the meantime, you can learn more about iCloud and what it might mean for MobileMe users in the following places:

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  2. Optional Search Engines in Safari 4.1

    Safari has long used Google as its built-in Web search engine of choice: the search field in the toolbar searched through Google. With the Apple-Google honeymoon apparently over, Safari 4.1 provides two additional choices for the search field: Yahoo and Bing.

    While Google is still the default choice, you can change it either in the General pane of Safari’s Preferences or from the menu that drops down from the search field when you click on the magnifying glass.

    • In Safari Preferences: Open the General pane in Safari preferences and choose a search engine from the Default Search Engine menu.

    • From the search field menu: Select the search engine you want, and it changes the setting in the Preference pane, too.

    If you’ve already done a search with one search engine and the text is still in the search field, selecting another from the menu instantly performs the search with that engine, using the text in the field.

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  3. Enhanced Features in Safari 4.1.x

    Tiger users, who can’t upgrade to Safari 5, are not frozen in time in regard to Safari 4, although the ebook Take Control of Safari 4 is frozen where it is. The seemingly minor upgrade to Safari 4.1 actually provides much of the functionality of Safari 5, as detailed here: http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1045/.

    Here’s a fleshed-out explanation of the two most important performance enhancements in Safari 4.1 (extracted from the ebook Take Control of Safari 5):

    • Prefetching and caching: Yes, it sounds like a Letterman “Stupid Pet Trick,” but “prefetching” is a clever way to increase your perceived page-loading speed as you go from one page to another. While you’re looking at one page, Safari scans it for links and looks up the DNS entry (the actual location of a page) for each, in case you click one. Improved caching (storing the pages you visit) should get you back to a previous location more quickly than in Safari 4.0.x.

    • New HTML support: This isn’t exactly invisible, since it’s all about seeing content on a page, but neither is it something you control or tweak. It just is—as long as Web pages use it. There’s support for new, cutting-edge HTML 5 features for typography, video, and graphics (transitions, gallery options, and virtual-reality viewing). Check out the mouth-watering examples at http://www.apple.com/html5/. These samples are proof that the Web can be an incredibly visually rich place without Flash, but until other browsers also fully support these standards, you might not be able to enjoy anything except examples.

    When it comes to capabilities you can see and manipulate, the Safari 4.1 (and later) update includes four items of note, each worthy of its own, more-detailed, entry in this blog:

    • Bing and Yahoo options for the search field

    • Enhanced auto-complete in the address field

    • The return of the blue progress bar in the address field

    • For tabbed browsing: a setting to make tabs the default for opening new pages; easier-to-drag tabs; and, an Undo command for when you accidentally close a tab.

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  4. What to Do If A New Email Message Is Completely Black

    Apple has posted a Knowledge Base article detailing a problem with generating Mail messages after installing Safari 5 on a system running the latest version of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard or 10.6 Snow Leopard. When you start an email message in Mail using some other program to get the ball rolling, the new message may have black text on a black background, rendering it unreadable.

    [This problem was fixed in Safari 5.1. —Tonya 27-Oct-2010]

    For full information see Apple’s article about the problem.

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  5. Safari 5 Features and First Reactions

    Apple has quietly released Safari 5, without so much as a “by the way” during the keynote speech at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference earlier this week. Safari 5 deserved at least a “by the way,” since it has under-the-hood as well as upfront improvements.

    The main changes are:

    • Reader: My immediate favorite is the Reader feature, accessed by a click of a button in the address field, where the RSS button usually resides. If a site has an RSS feed, you can press and hold down on the RSS button to pop-up a menu with Reader and RSS options. Open a Reader view and everything except the article(s) on the page fade into the background—a wonderful way to get rid of screen clutter and focus on what you want to read, though if you want read or write comments on an article, you may have to remember to exit Reader view and locate the comment options.

      Reader can show you multiple articles from a Web page and, even better, stitch together an article that’s split across several pages, all in a single, scrollable pseudo-window that, oddly enough, seems to present text in only the Palatino font no matter the original design or your Safari preferences settings. A pop-up toolbar at the bottom of the Reader window lets you zoom, print, or email the article. (Reader works only in Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard and later, not in the Safari 4.1 version available to 10.4 Tiger users.)

    • Speed bump: The new “Nitro Engine” (whose name neatly fits the “under-the-hood” metaphor) apparently increases Safari’s overall speed of Web-page loading, with a 30 percent increase over Safari 4’s Javascript running. I can’t see any difference—but I can’t run the two versions side by side, and I have a new laptop with its own speed increases, so I’m not in a good position to judge.

    • Prefetching and caching: Prefetching sounds like a candidate for Letterman’s “Stupid Pet Tricks,” but prefetching is a clever way to increase your perceived browsing speed as you go from one page to another. While you’re looking at one page, Safari scans it for links and looks up the DNS entries ahead of time in case you click on one of them. And, when you’re moving in the other direction, back to a page you’ve already visited, improved caching techniques should get you there more quickly.

    • New HTML5 support: Safari 5 adds support for new, cutting-edge HTML 5 features for typography, video, and graphics (transitions, gallery options, and virtual-reality viewing). Check out the mouth-watering examples at Apple’s HTML5 Web page. These samples are proof that the Web can be an incredibly rich place without Flash, but until other browsers also fully support these standards, you might not be able to enjoy anything except examples.

    • Bing and Yahoo searches: The convenience of Safari’s built-in Google search field has kept me pretty much to just that search engine, except when I’m looking for images—Bing is far superior in its presentation of image hits, so I keep it in my Bookmarks bar specifically for that purpose. Safari 5, however, provides a drop-down menu in the search field that offers Google, Bing, and Yahoo. Google must be off sulking, or perhaps licking its wounds, after losing this exclusive.

    • Extensions: Yesss! Built-in support for Safari add-ons! But not yet… that is, the support is there, but the third-party extensions aren’t, because Apple’s requiring them to go through official channels (the Safari Developer Program, with free enrollment). The vetting process should keep offerings as stable as possible, and even then they’ll be “sandboxed” so that if one crashes, it won’t take down Safari with it. Safari itself will be checking for an Apple-assigned encrypted imprimatur in every extension to keep out the riffraff. Expect the first add-ons to dribble out in a matter of weeks, with the floodgates opening toward the end of summer. Apple’s upcoming Safari Extensions Gallery will serve as a centralized hub.

    A few other new things are already apparent in just an hour or two of Safari use. The blue progress bar in the background of the address field while a page is loading is back: I’ve learned to live without it, but welcome it’s return. The address field itself is smarter: type any part of a site you’ve visited (not just the beginning of the name), and if the site is in your bookmarks or History, Safari lists it as a suggestion. And, a welcome anti-clutter feature is a new Safari preferences setting that lets you specify that new pages opened from outside of Safari (when you click on a link in an email, for instance) should open in tabs instead of in new windows.

    To learn more, read Adam Engst’s TidBITS article, Apple Extends Safari 5 with Reader, HTML5, Performance.

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  6. Safari 5 Update Compatibility

    For the Macintosh, the free Safari update requires Mac OS X Leopard 10.5.8 or Snow Leopard 10.6.2 or 10.6.3. If you’re still using 10.4 Tiger, you can take advantage of many of Safari 5’s features other than Safari Reader by upgrading to Safari 4.1 for Tiger, which is also available via Software Update.

    The Windows versions of Safari 5 run under Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7; they seem to be available from Apple’s Safari 5 download page.

    To learn more about what’s new in Safari 5.1 for Tiger, look at later entries in this blog, especially Enhanced Features in Safari 4.1.

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  7. New Shortcut for Adding Something to Top Sites

    In Safari 4.0.3 (it might have crept in for 4.0.2—these minor updates came quickly), there’s another way to add an item to your Top Sites view: when you press Command-D to make a bookmark for the current page, the top choice in the pop-up menu is Top Sites. (Frankly, I use this so seldom—in fact, never–that I’m annoyed that it’s sitting at the top of the menu, making everything else a little farther away from my cursor.)

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  8. What to Do if a Safari Pop-Up Wants You to Download Antivirus Software

    Over the weekend, numerous visitors to the New York Times Web site saw pop-ups masquerading as antivirus alerts and advertising Windows software that was itself malware. Learn more about this—and potentially other similar scenarios that could occur when you browse the Web using Safari—in the TidBITS article New York Times Web Site Compromised; How to Stay Safe.

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  9. Cookies in Safari Taste Better after GarageBand 5.1 Update

    In the update notes for Apple’s recent release of GarageBand 5.1, Apple says:

    “When GarageBand is opened, Safari’s preferences are changed to always accept cookies. The default preference is to accept cookies only for the sites being visited. The altered setting may allow third parties and advertisers to track a user’s web activity. This update addresses the issue by not changing the preference setting. Users who have run previous versions of GarageBand should confirm that their Safari preferences are set as desired.”

    If you use GarageBand 5 (part of iLife ‘09), you should install the GarageBand update. You can get it via Software Update on your Mac (choose Software Update from the Apple menu) or download it from Apple. After installing the update, most likely you’ll want to set your cookie preferences to “Only from sites I visit.” To do so, in Safari, choose Safari > Preferences, click the Security button on the toolbar, and look in the “Accept cookies” section.

    This ebook doesn’t talk much about cookies, so in case you’re wondering, a cookie is a chunk of information that a Web site stores on your Mac when you visit the site. The information is then used to track something about your relationship with the Web site, such as the contents of a shopping cart.

    When you check “Only from sites I visit,” you’re also turning on “Block cookies from third parties and advertisers.” Typically, this type of cookie would be placed on your Mac from an advertiser or data accumulater that has a presence on a Web page that you visited, such as an advertisement. See Wikipedia’s discussion of third-party cookies for more info.

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  10. Listen to Sharon Talk about Safari 4 on the MacVoices Podcast

    Sharon Zardetto, author of Take Control of Safari 4, talks about why she wrote the ebook, the new features in Safari 4 (both end-user features and under-the-hood techie features), and covers a wide range of related topics in MacVoices #978. (After listening to the podcast, if you’re looking for the “What Is a Browser” Google video, you can find it here.)

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

  11. “Take Control of Safari 4” Guides Readers Beyond Basic Browsing

    We’ve just released Take Control of Safari 4, a new book by long-time Mac author Sharon Zardetto. We’ve had many requests for a thorough explanation of Apple’s Safari Web browser, and the beta of Safari 4 inspired Sharon to comb through the program, documenting exactly how it works for those who would like to learn a few non-obvious features so they can get more out of the program. If, to pick just a few of the topics covered, you’ve been slacking off on learning how to organize your bookmarks into a highly useful bookmarks bar, if you’ve never bothered to learn the keyboard shortcuts for working with tabs efficiently, or if you’ve always wanted to read RSS feeds but never quite figured them out, this 92-page ebook is for you. The book is available in both PDF ($10) and print ($19.99) formats.

    In Take Control of Safari 4, you’ll learn about new features like Top Sites and searching the page content of your bookmarks and history, and you’ll get answers to questions like these:

    • How do I load six Web pages at once?
    • Now that I’ve loaded six pages, how do I best work with them?
    • What are all the keyboard shortcuts for working with tabs?
    • How do I bookmark a page I want to return to?
    • How do I import Firefox bookmarks?
    • I have 1,042 bookmarks. Is there a sensible way to search or organize them?
    • What are the default keyboard shortcuts for the bookmarks bar?
    • Can I search for text on the currently active Web page?
    • How do I erase my history to prevent someone snooping through it?
    • Where does Safari store Web site user names and passwords?
    • Help! However Safari stored my password, it doesn’t work any more!
    • How do I use Safari to read RSS headlines from different sites?
    • How do I “snip” a Web page to make it into a Dashboard widget?

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

The Author

Sharon Zardetto has been writing about the Macintosh professionally since 1984, including nearly a thousand articles in Macintosh magazines and over 20 books. She’s best known for writing several editions of The Macintosh Bible, along with The Mac Almanac.