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Take Control of Upgrading to Mountain Lion

Upgrading/Using

Save $5 when you purchase with Take Control of Using Mountain Lion for only $25!

Price
$15.00
Pages
171
Formats
PDF EPUB Mobi
Version
1.2.1
Updated
Apr 02, 2013
The Author

Joe Kissell has written more than 50 books about the Mac, including many popular Take Control ebooks. He runs Joe On Tech and is also a contributing editor of TidBITS and a senior contributor to Macworld.

Take Control of Upgrading to Mountain Lion

Install OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion with confidence!

Best-selling author Joe Kissell guides you through every step in the process of upgrading to Mountain Lion. You’ll begin with a compatibility check, learn to make a suitable pre-upgrade backup, and then follow assorted pre-upgrade advice, including managing your Apple ID, deleting digital detritus, and making a safe copy of the installer file. Joe helps you pick an upgrade plan: in-place (easy), clean install (for control freaks), over Leopard (a time-saving option), and even how to move your stuff from an older Mac to a new one that’s running Mountain Lion. He also describes the basics of installing Mountain Lion Server. After guiding you through the upgrade, Joe gets you started with key post-installation steps. You’ll also find troubleshooting advice in case of upgrade failure, along with a chapter about Recovery mode.

More Info

In particular, you’ll learn how to:

  • Manage iCloud: During your Mountain Lion installation, you’ll be asked for an Apple ID, but should you enter one? And, if you have more than one, which one? You’ll find advice for sorting out your Apple ID before you enter the installer.

  • Upgrade from Tiger or Leopard: How will you download the installer from the Mac App Store on one of these Macs? What about Rosetta for PowerPC-based apps? Joe answers these questions and discusses the special challenges you’ll encounter when trying to upgrade efficiently from 10.4 Tiger or 10.5 Leopard.

  • Handle Your Hardware: Check for Mountain Lion compatibility, clear extra files and software off your disk, and test your Mac to be sure all the hardware and disks are running properly—better to discover and correct a problem now than on upgrade day.

  • Deal with duplication: Learn why having a duplicate of your hard disk is essential before installing Mountain Lion, and how to make one. Also, get help with backing up a Windows volume, should you be running Windows on your Mac via Boot Camp.

  • Consider a few geeky details: If you secure your data and documents with disk encryption now, or would like to under Mountain Lion, get advice on what to do before you upgrade and learn why Joe likes Apple’s FileVault 2. Also, read what Joe thinks of partitioning and what you might want to do about it before installing.

  • Perform the upgrade: Run the Mountain Lion installer, choosing all the optimal settings and options for your computer and tastes, and make sure all your personal data is still in place afterward.

  • Perform post-installation tasks: You’re not done when the installer is - be sure to run Software Update, set up necessary user accounts, and (perhaps) turn on FileVault and Time Machine. You’ll find help with troubleshooting any problems that may have occurred with your upgrade.

  • Go beyond the basics: Joe even covers topics such as the basics of installing Mountain Lion Server; moving from an older Mac to a newer one that already has Mountain Lion installed; and using Recovery mode to fix disk problems, reinstall Mountain Lion, and perform other maintenance tasks.

What's New

What’s New in Version 1.2

Version 1.2 is a minor update intended to address several issues I learned about in the week or so following Mountain Lion’s release. Apart from small typographical changes, this version of the book changes the following:

  • Clarifies an extra step you may need to perform to uncheck a volume’s Ignore Ownership setting; see the sidebar RTFM
  • Adds a note about Mountain Lion’s Web Sharing feature in Check Service Settings and Turn Deactivated Features Back On
  • Includes direct URLs for Mountain Lion in Obtain the Installer, and Mountain Lion Server in Install Mountain Lion Server
  • Updates the sidebar Make a Bootable Mountain Lion Installer Volume to give directions for using Lion DiskMaker
  • Adds a recommendation to Turn Off Anti-malware Software to avoid potential problems downloading Mountain Lion
  • Adds a step in Migrate from Another Mac to avoid a crashing bug in Migration Assistant
FAQ

Before I buy this ebook, can you tell me if my Macintosh will work with OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion?

Mountain Lion’s basic hardware requirements are somewhat complex. According to Apple, you’ll need not just an Intel Core 2 Duo or better processor, but also a logic board that’s designed to boot into a 64-bit kernel, as well as an “advanced GPU (graphics processing unit) chipset.” Apple lists which Mac models meet these requirements at http://www.apple.com/osx/specs/.

To find out which Mac model you have:

  • If you’re running 10.7 Lion, choose About This Mac from the Apple menu and then click More Info. Then choose Window > About This Mac.

  • If you’re running 10.6 Snow Leopard or earlier, well, you could buy this ebook for more help—you can ask for a refund if it turns out that your Mac is too old. Another resource is the MacTracker app.

Reader Comments

WOW!

I just did an upgrade to Mountain Lion from Lion and all I can say is….WOW! Your Take Control instructions were educational, informative, and well directed. —Kristopher Johnson

Thanks So Much

Thanks so much for a super ebook for upgrading to Lion. I upgraded earlier today with my iMac. I had ZERO problems due to your ebook. And, all my third-party apps which I upgraded, as appropriate, worked fine. —Barry B.

Great Value

I bought both Take Control books—‘Upgrading to Lion’ and ‘Using Lion’. They’ve been great value and really very useful. I upgraded four Macs with no problems whatsoever after creating a boot disc as described. Where I needed to keep Snow Leopard alongside Lion, because of PPC software, I followed the instructions and once again, experienced a smooth installation. —Dave W, from the UK

Really Useful Advice

Excellent books, and really useful advice. I successfully upgraded to Lion following your advice and guidance….If I had not purchased these books I would have definitely run into trouble. I had no idea the upgrade was something that had to be handled with such a lot of preparation and thought. —Thanks, C.P.

Update Plans

September 5, 2014 – We don’t plan to update the Mountain Lion edition of this ebook again, but check the Take Control catalog to find similar titles about later versions of OS X.

Posted by Tonya Engst

Blog
  1. You May Need to Re-download Your OS X Installer

    One of the recommendations I make in my Take Control of Upgrading to… books could potentially cause a headache unless you know how to avoid it. I tell you to save a copy of the OS X installer that you’ve downloaded so that, if the occasion should ever arise when you need to reinstall it or put it on another Mac, you don’t have to download it again. Saving the installer requires deliberate action, because if you leave it in /Applications and run it from there, OS X deletes the installer app once your new version of OS X is in place. (Some people go a step further and create a bootable volume, such as a USB flash drive, containing the installer, which makes it easier to install on multiple Macs.)

    Unfortunately, if you followed my advice and kept a copy of your installer prior to February 14, 2016 (whether or not you turned it into a bootable volume), you’ll find that the installer no longer works the next time you try to run it, because the certificate that Apple used to sign the installer (a crucial security step) expired on that day. Josh Centers explains the whole thing in the TidBITS article Previously Downloaded OS X Installers No Longer Work.

    If you’ve already saved the installer but don’t need it yet, you can delete it and download a fresh copy (now updated with a new certificate); that way you’ll be ready if and when you need it. If you created a bootable installer volume, you’ll need to erase it and follow the instructions in my book to recreate it.

    Should you find yourself suddenly in need to reinstall OS X but not have an updated installer handy, there are ways (mentioned in Josh’s article) to trick OS X into running the old installer, but they’re not ideal, and I recommend planning ahead for best results.

    This issue appears to affect every version of OS X from OS X 10.11 El Capitan back to 10.7 Lion, although a few users have reported that their previously downloaded installers continue to work (the reasons for which are unclear).

    Posted by Joe Kissell (Permalink)

  2. TidBITS Presents: We’re Talking Mountain Lion

    We have just held the second TidBITS Presents live event using Google+ Hangouts, this one dedicated to Mountain Lion. Joe Kissell and Matt Neuberg, authors respectively of Take Control of Upgrading to Mountain Lion and Take Control Using Mountain Lion, each gave live presentations and answered questions from viewers. Why are we telling you about it after the event is over? Because the Internet never forgets: although you won’t be able to ask questions, you can view and listen to the event in its entirety on our TidBITS Presents page.

    Posted by Michael E. Cohen (Permalink)