Get the most out of Mojave!

Learn what's new in macOS 10.14 Mojave and how to put its numerous
great features to use with Take Control of Mojave by Scholle McFarland.

Take Control of Upgrading to Mojave

Mojave & iOS 12 Bundle

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Price
$9.99
Pages
118
Formats
PDF EPUB Mobi
Version
1.2
Updated
Oct 01, 2018

Take Control of Upgrading to Mojave

Smooth your transition to Mojave!

macOS 10.14 Mojave improves performance, fixes bugs, and adds new features. But upgrading from an older version of macOS can sometimes be a confusing and frustrating experience—especially if you’re currently running a much older operating system, or if you encounter unexpected hiccups in the process. In Take Control of Upgrading to Mojave, Mac expert Joe Kissell outlines a process that will take the stress out of upgrading, showing you how to make the switch more efficiently and in the way that’s right for you. Learn what you need to know before you begin, how to prepare your Mac and make backups, and be ready to make decisions about questions that arise during and after installation.

In this book, you’ll find out more about further changes Apple has made to the APFS file system in Mojave (and what they may mean to you), along with possible impediments to upgrading—including minimum system requirements, software incompatibilities, and lack of disk space—and how to resolve those issues.

The book explains in detail how to…

  • Start fast: A Quick Start overview helps you read lightly or more deeply, depending on your needs.
  • Take in the view: Find out what you can look forward to in Mojave.
  • Check for compatibility: Make sure your hardware and software are ready for Mojave and consider whether this is a good time to buy new hardware, even if it’s not essential for your upgrade.
  • Back up: Avoid upgrade anxiety by ensuring you can return to the previous state of your Mac—and that you can boot from your backup. Joe provides steps for carrying out this essential task in Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper!.
  • Pick a plan: Go for an easy in-place upgrade or consider a more complex clean install. Find out which option is right for you.
  • Install: Download and store the installer where it won’t be deleted, with special tips for people who want to install on multiple Macs or who have bandwidth limitations. And, although running the installer will be easy for many people, you’ll find full steps for what to click and when.
  • Do a post-installation tune-up: Make sure your new system is running smoothly by completing important housekeeping tasks and making a few key decisions.
  • Troubleshoot: Yikes! It is possible that something will go wrong during installation, or that once you’ve booted up under Mojave that you’ll encounter a serious problem. Joe’s time-tested troubleshooting advice will help get your system working again.

In addition, this book covers a number of new Mojave-specific topics:

  • The good and bad aspects of Apple’s changes to the APFS file system
  • Changes to Setup Assistant, what the new screens mean, and how to handle them
  • New, possibly confusing, and definitely annoying alerts asking you to grant accessibility, automation, and full disk access
  • Adjustments to the ways macOS can look for and install software updates
  • Huge changes to the way Mail handles plugins, and how to deal with them
  • Safari’s revised approach to extensions, and what to do if your favorite extension won’t load
  • What’s new, added, removed, and rearranged in System Preferences
  • What to do if you run the Mojave installer, restart, and find your Mac is still running your old version of macOS
  • Revised instructions for downgrading to your earlier system if that becomes necessary
What's New

Version 1.2 of this book includes a few important details that I learned after the publication of version 1.1:

  • Added a sidebar, “The 2012 iMac Boot Camp Problem” (and several notes throughout the book directing readers to it), to detail an odd compatibility problem with one specific iMac configuration
  • In “Full Disk Access,” added information about permission changes required to use Backblaze, Terminal, and SSH

Version 1.1 of this book was a minor update to make a few small corrections and bring the book up to date with the shipping version of Mojave. The changes were:

  • Clarified some language about booting from a backup disk in “But I Really Don’t Want to Make a Duplicate!”
  • Updated details about CleanMyMac X in “De-Clutter Your Disk”
  • Added a link to the Mojave installer in the Mac App Store in “Download on the Destination Mac”
  • In “Select the Information to Transfer,” clarified that only certain Mac models prompt you to set passwords when migrating from a bootable duplicate
  • Noted in “System Preferences Changes” that you can now also sync Voice Memos data with iCloud
FAQ

From what versions of macOS/OS X/Mac OS X will this book help me upgrade?

The book covers upgrading from macOS 10.13 High Sierra all the way back to Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, along with upgrading from the Mojave public beta.

Can you tell me if my Mac will work with macOS 10.14 Mojave?

Mojave does not support Mac models introduced before 2012. Macs that can run Mojave include the following:

  • iMac (Late 2012 or newer)
  • iMac Pro (2017)
  • MacBook (Early 2015 or newer)
  • MacBook Air (Mid 2012 or newer)
  • MacBook Pro (Mid 2012 or newer)
  • Mac mini (Late 2012 or newer)
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013, plus Mid 2010 or Mid 2012 with Metal-capable GPU, such as MSI Gaming Radeon RX 560 or Sapphire Radeon PULSE RX 580)
Update Plans

October 1, 2018—The book has been updated to version 1.2 to reflect the release version of Mojave. If there are significant changes in future versions of Mojave, we may update the book to reflect those changes.

Posted by Joe Kissell

The Author

Take Control publisher Joe Kissell has written more than 60 books about technology, including many popular Take Control books. He also runs Interesting Thing of the Day and is a contributing editor of TidBITS and a senior contributor to Macworld.