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Read Me First: A Take Control Crash Course
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Published
Sep 03, 2014
The Author

Tonya Engst co-founded the TidBITS online publication in 1990 with Adam Engst. She also co-founded the Take Control Books series with Adam in 2003 and saw the series through its early years, working with many talented authors and editors to add hundreds of titles and to create a process that could easily produce PDF and EPUB/Mobipocket formatted ebooks from the same WYSIWYG manuscript. Tonya was editor-in-chief of the Take Control series from 2003–2017.

Read Me First: A Take Control Crash Course

This ebook explains the basic assumptions that underlie most how-to writing about the Macintosh, including ebooks in the Take Control series. It also contains a few topics about the iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch.

Update Plans

November 28, 2017 — This book has been superseded by Tonya’s newer title, Take Control of Mac Basics.

Blog
  1. What Happened to Read Me First: A Take Control Crash Course?

    Thanks for your interest in my ebook, Read Me First: A Take Control Crash Course! Written in 2014, this title was available for free from the Take Control website until midway through 2017, when it was withdrawn because the screenshots were dated and the information wasn’t always accurate for new versions of macOS.

    When I wrote this ebook, I was editor-in-chief of the Take Control series, and I wrote it largely so we didn’t have to repeat certain topics in other Take Control titles. Of these, the three biggies were figuring out what version of macOS or iOS you were running, launching the System Preferences app on the Mac, and understanding directory paths. Keep reading below for tips on these three tasks.

    The 49-page ebook did cover a few other topics, and if you’re running 10.9 Mavericks, 10.10 Yosemite, or 10.11 El Capitan and really want a copy of the PDF, feel free to ask at support@tidbits.com. Some time after this title lived out its useful life, I used it as the starting point for another ebook, Take Control of Mac Basics. Weighing in at about three times the page count, Take Control of Mac Basics costs $15 and covers even more of the fundamentals of using a Mac while sharing oodles of tips for improving your everyday Mac experience.

    Finding Your System Version

    To complete this simple task on the Mac, move the pointer to the upper-left corner of the screen and click the Apple icon. Choose About This Mac from the menu. A window appears. Text in this window tells you the operating system version. Where, exactly, that text appears depends on which version. Look carefully and you’ll find it.

    What about iOS? In iOS, open the Settings app and tap General. Then, tap About. Look on the About screen for the Version line, which will provide the version of iOS.

    Launching System Preferences

    Imagine this. You want to change the background image on your Mac’s Desktop. You search in Google for instructions and find an article that promises to tell you what to do. But, it tells you to open System Preferences. Okay, fine… but where is System Preferences? For that matter, what is System Preferences?

    First, it’s an app that provides a home for “preference panes,” most of which come from Apple and let you configure various aspects of your Mac experience. Other preference panes are installed by third-party apps.

    To open System Preferences, click the Apple icon at the upper-left corner of the Mac screen. Then, choose System Preferences. That’s the most obvious and reliable method, but there are lots of other methods, such as clicking its gear icon in the Dock, pressing Command-Space to invoke Spotlight, and then typing “sys,” and even clicking the round Siri icon on the menu bar and saying “open System Preferences” (assuming you’re running macOS 10.12 Sierra or later and have Siri enabled).

    Understanding Paths

    Any file or folder on a Mac can be found by navigating from a known starting point—usually the main level of a drive, through any intervening folders, to the item. Instead of writing out all that navigation with a lot of “Open this, then open that,” we use a path.

    For example, if I want to tell someone where to find their Photos Library, I could say “open your home folder. Then open your Pictures folder. That’s where you’ll find a file called Photos Library.photoslibrary.” That’s a lot to write out and boring to read. So, instead, I could use a path and say, “You’ll find your Photos Library at /Users/homeFolder/Pictures/Photos Library.photoslibrary.”

    A Tilde ~ in a Path

    Paths like the one above that tell you to go to a spot inside the home folder can be awkward, since the writer can’t know the name of your home folder. Fortunately, there’s a shortcut. To indicate more gracefully that a path includes the user’s home folder, a writer might begin the path with a tilde character, like this: ~/Pictures/Photos Library.photoslibrary.

    Typing or Pasting a Path

    Instead of following a path by clicking from folder to folder in the Finder, you might wish to type the path—or copy and paste it. Pasting is handy when you want to follow a complex path that you see in an ebook or on the Web—you can copy the path using the Edit > Copy command and then paste it with Edit > Paste. Typing a path can also be a useful way to view a folder that is normally hidden. For example, if the instructions for some Unix task tell you to look in /var/log, this is your only method of navigating there—unless you want to work on the command line.

    To follow a path by typing or pasting it, follow these steps:

    1. In the Finder, choose Go > Go to Folder.
    2. Enter the path by typing or pasting it, if you’ve already copied it.
    3. Click the Go button.

    A Finder window opens, showing the folder whose path you entered.

    Posted by Tonya Engst (Permalink)

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