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Kirk Riffs on the Second Edition

Kirk and Chuck Joiner of MacVoices discuss what’s new in the second edition of Kirk’s book (including coverage of new features and new interfaces for older features), why splitting iTunes into separate apps may not be practical, and tips for classical music management.

Posted by Michael E. Cohen (Permalink)

Updated Presets in HandBrake 1.0

Video-ripping app HandBrake has finally reached version 1.0 — actually 1.0.2 as of this writing. With that comes a few minor changes, but the most significant for readers of “Take Control of Apple TV” are the new presets. The now-legacy AppleTV 3 preset I recommended in the book is still there, but you should instead choose the Apple1080p60 Surround preset, which is now the best-quality Apple-compatible HandBrake preset.

Posted by Josh Centers (Permalink)

Joe explains the “most fun” book about death you’ll read this year

Ignore the purple hair (or, like us, revel in its sublime beauty) as you listen to Joe explain to Chuck Joiner of MacVoices how he came to write this book. Though you won’t hear Blue Öyster Cult’s “(Don’t Fear) the Reaper” playing in the background, the tips and tactics Joe offers for controlling your digital legacy may leave you humming it.

Posted by Michael E. Cohen (Permalink)

Slack Adds Threads

Slack has finally added one of its most requested features: threads! Updated versions of Slack for all platforms and the Web now allow you to start a thread in reply to any message. Threads are shown in both a channel-specific sidebar in the Web and desktop apps, and in a pane in the mobile apps. You can also view threads in which you’re a participant in a new All Threads/New Threads view reachable from the sidebar. I wrote a TidBITS article explaining the feature and how best to use it.

At this writing, we have no plans to update this book. The addition of threading didn’t change other features in the ecosystem.

Posted by Glenn Fleishman (Permalink)

Sierra Users: Don’t Edit PDFs in Preview

macOS 10.12 Sierra has been plagued with PDF problems. First, there were problems with PDFs created using ScanSnap scanners, but those issues turned out to be relatively mild and Apple addressed them in the 10.12.1 update.

Unfortunately, 10.12.2 Sierra ushered in even more troubling issues with PDFs. Developers have reported a number of PDFKit problems, most notably the OCR text layer being deleted when manipulated by apps using PDFKit, including Preview. The main takeaway is that you shouldn’t use Preview to edit PDFs until these issues are resolved, hopefully in 10.12.3. In the meantime, if you have to edit a PDF, either work only on a copy, just in case, or consider investing in Smile’s PDFpen, which annotates and edits PDFs independent of Apple’s PDFKit.

For more about this problem, read the TidBITS article Sierra PDF Problems Get Worse in 10.12.2.

[Fixed? In the release notes for the 10.12.3 Sierra update, which were made available on January 23rd, Apple says that the update “fixes an issue that prevented the searching of scanned PDF documents in Preview.” Other PDF-related problems appear to remain in Preview, so continue to work with caution even after you install this update. See Apple Releases macOS Sierra 10.12.3, iOS 10.2.1, tvOS 10.1.1, and watchOS 3.1.1, in TidBITS, for more information. —Tonya, 1/24/2017]

Posted by Josh Centers (Permalink)

Josh Explains What’s New with Apple TV and tvOS

Apple TV, slowly but surely, continues to gain features and capabilities, this time with its new TV app and Single Sign-on capability. Josh and Chuck Joiner of MacVoices discuss the state of streaming TV, Apple TV’s place in this dynamic and highly contested market, and what’s new in the latest edition of his book. Adjust your rabbit ears, sit back, and enjoy.

Posted by Michael E. Cohen (Permalink)

Jeff and Joe on Serial Collaboration and Apple Watch

Jeff Carlson and Joe Kissell spend some time with Chuck Joiner of MacVoices describing what’s new in their co-authored Crash Course about Apple Watch and how the current edition came about. Learn what special Watch features float each of their boats and more in this timely interview.

Posted by Michael E. Cohen (Permalink)

iOS 10 Adds Unsecured Hotspot Warning

October 2, 2016 — Both iOS 10 and macOS Sierra have appeared since the last update of this book, but the portions related to Wi-Fi and networking have changed very, very little. We have no current plans to update the book.

Apple added a fairly severe warning about using an unencrypted network connection in iOS 10. Select a network that doesn’t have any network security enabled, and iOS displays “Security Recommendation” in the main Wi-Fi view, and then explains further in a details screen, which includes a link to follow to get even more information. The warning suggests that “you” update the network to WPA2 Personal security, but it shows up for public hotspots, including Apple Stores, not just ones you ostensibly control. The warning is well intentioned but the message poorly considered.

There are a few other very minor changes. Apple changed the icons used in AirPlay for some destinations in iOS 10. And a new release of Airfoil appeared since our last update that gives it a different appearance, but the features we discuss remain the same.

Posted by Glenn Fleishman (Permalink)

MyMac’s Review of “Take Control of Preview”

Elisa Pacelli of MyMac.com reviewed Take Control of Preview, saying “Once again, TidBITS hits it out of the park with their latest book.” Pacelli offers a summary of Take Control of Preview and shares a few of her favorite parts. “Some tips can literally be life changing,” she said.

Posted by Josh Centers (Permalink)

Joe and Chuck in a Parallels Universe

Joe spends some quality time with Chuck Joiner of MacVoices to discuss Joe’s new book. Joe begins by describing why, at the moment anyway, Parallels is his choice for running Windows, Linux, and other OSes on his Mac, including beta versions of new macOS releases. The discussion goes on to cover what is new in Parallels 12, security issues, using external drives, and how to wrangle your other peripherals with guest operating systems on your Mac.

Posted by Michael E. Cohen (Permalink)