Digital Sharing for Apple Users: A Take Control Crash Course
by Joe Kissell

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Send Photos and Videos to Others

You’ve just taken some photos or videos with your iOS device, or maybe you’ve imported photos from your digital camera to your Mac. Now you want to send them to friends, relatives, or colleagues. You can do this in many ways, and the hardest part may be deciding how you want to send them.

Of course, photos and videos are just files, so any technique you can use to Send Files to Others or Broadcast Download Links should work just fine—and one of those may in fact be the best choice. On the other hand, numerous apps and services specialize in photos and videos, giving you a wider array of options, some of which may be better suited to your needs.

When trying to choose a method for delivering visual content, ask yourself:

What do you want the recipients to do with the photos or videos?

Let’s look at some possible answers that question, and a few of the options suitable to each answer.

View Fleetingly or Pass On

Sometimes you just want someone to glance at a photo, smile, and move on—or possibly pass it on to other people who might find it funny or interesting.

If the photo isn’t particularly private or sensitive—and assuming the recipient(s) participate in one of your social media circles—you might in fact broadcast it to:

…or any of numerous similar services. Remember that doing this means you have limited control over which other people—perhaps less close to you—can also see them.

In Photos (OS X or iOS), iPhoto, Aperture, or the OS X Finder, select one or more photos, tap or click Share ( or ) and then Twitter, Facebook, or Flickr to post the photo (with optional comments). For any other service, use the corresponding app or Web site.

**①** After you tap the Share button in Photos for iOS, tap Twitter, Facebook, or Flickr (outlined here in red) to send the photo(s) to that service.
After you tap the Share button in Photos for iOS, tap Twitter, Facebook, or Flickr (outlined here in red) to send the photo(s) to that service.

View Privately

If a photo or video is not intended for public consumption, avoid social media and use a more private communication method. Even then, remember that once the file is out of your hands, anything can happen (and often does).

**②** After you tap the camera icon in Messages for iOS, you can tap a recent photo or look for an older one in your photo library.
After you tap the camera icon in Messages for iOS, you can tap a recent photo or look for an older one in your photo library.

Save or Process

If you’re building a growing collection of photos or videos—or if your goal is to have them processed in some way (made into a Web page or movie, used in a book, digitally restored, etc.), then sending is probably not the ideal form of sharing. Instead, put them in your Dropbox folder and follow the steps in Sync Folders with Others.

Display on the Fridge

When you want a photo to end up on paper, try:

**③** One of the options available when you click the Share button (shown here in iPhoto) is to order prints.
One of the options available when you click the Share button (shown here in iPhoto) is to order prints.
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