Read Me First: A Take Control Crash Course
by Tonya Engst

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Table of Contents

Copy, Cut, and Paste

This chapter explains the Copy command—and the related Cut and Paste commands. These three commands allow you to duplicate or move text, graphics, and more within documents, between documents, or even between apps, saving you from unnecessary work and avoiding errors in the process .

① 	Top: Before—The star is in the left window, but it’s not in the right window. Bottom: After—The star has been copied from the left and pasted at the right.

① Top: Before—The star is in the left window, but it’s not in the right window. Bottom: After—The star has been copied from the left and pasted at the right.

How to Copy

  1. Select the item you want to copy:
    • For a graphic, you can usually click it once to select it.
    • For text, click and drag to select it (for some text-selection tricks, read Five favorite text-selection tips, by Sharon Zardetto).
  2. Choose Edit > Copy. (Pretty much everyone presses Command-C. In fact, you might even see directions that tell you to “Command-C the selection.”)

The Mac transfers a copy of the selected item to an internal holding spot called the clipboard, replacing whatever was previously there.

Copy vs. Cut

With a copy, your original selection stays as it was. But, what if you don’t want that? What if, as in the example in , you want to use the paste operation to, in effect, move the original to a new place? No problem. That’s what Cut is for.

② 	Oops! I put the picnic on the wrong day in the Calendar app...

② Oops! I put the picnic on the wrong day in the Calendar app…

How to Cut

Follow the instructions for How to Copy, above, but instead of choosing Edit > Copy, choose Edit > Cut (or press Command-X). Your Mac deletes the selected item, putting it on the clipboard and replacing whatever was there before.

How to Paste

  1. Copy or cut the item that you want to paste .
    ③ 	...No problem! I click the event once to select it (shown here with a blue highlight), and then I press Command-X to _move_ it to the clipboard; then...

    ③ …No problem! I click the event once to select it (shown here with a blue highlight), and then I press Command-X to move it to the clipboard; then…

  2. Position the insertion point where you want the item to go. (For a graphic, that might mean clicking in the document window to activate that window; you can adjust the graphic’s position after you paste it.)
  3. Choose Edit > Paste. (Most people press Command-V instead. You may even read badly edited instructions that tell you to “-C and then -V.”)

Whatever was on the clipboard appears at the insertion point or in the active document, as with the particular day in the calendar .

④ 	...I click in the square for September 1 to select it and press Command-V. The event copies from the clipboard to September 1.

④ …I click in the square for September 1 to select it and press Command-V. The event copies from the clipboard to September 1.

Tip: Once something is in the clipboard, you can issue the Paste command more than once. The same item will keep on pasting until you copy or cut something else. When you copy or cut something else, the new item replaces the old item.

Tip: You can paste Web URLs into your Web browser’s address field.

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“You can put more than one item on the Mac clipboard with LaunchBar, Keyboard Maestro, or PTHPasteboard Pro.”

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